Neighborhood Connections Reduce Poor Health Outcomes In The Elderly: Study Finds

Strong Neighborhood Connections Cut Poor Health Risk

Mental Health News

A team of researchers at Rutgers University explored how strong neighborhood connections reduce the negative impact of living alone. The study is published in the journal Social Science and Medicine.

The Study

The researchers surveyed data from the Population Study of the Chinese Elderly in Chicago (PINE). They specifically examined the link between neighborhood cohesion in Chinese Americans living in the greater Chicago area and early mortality rates.

The Findings

The results revealed that strong social cohesions within neighborhoods can affect the health and lifespan of the elderly population. Such connections are negatively associated with poor health outcomes, such as depression, cardiovascular disease, dementia, poor biological health, and premature death.

The authors added: “Our findings show the particular challenges faced by older adults who live alone in communities with little interaction or connection. Enhancing neighborhood cohesion may be a promising way to reduce early death for older adults who live alone.

To Know More You May Refer To

Jiang, Y., Li, M., & Chung, T. (2022). Living alone and all-cause mortality in community-dwelling older adults: The moderating role of perceived neighborhood cohesion. Social science & medicine (1982)317, 115568. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2022.115568

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