Lucid Dying: Patients Recall Near-Death Experiences During CPR

Lucid Dying

Science News

A research team at NYU Grossman School of Medicine explored the unique phenomenon of CPR-related “lucid dying” experiences. The study was presented in the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions of 2022.

The Study

The researchers examined 567 men and women from 25 hospitals in the US and the UK, who had CPR and other resuscitation methods used on them after cardiac arrest.

The participants were asked to recall death experiences and recordings of their hidden brain activity were also made. The results were then tallied with the testimonies of 126 community survivors of cardiac arrest with self-reported memories of lucid experiences of death.

The Findings

The results revealed that all survivors of cardiac arrest experienced lucid experiences of death. These lucid dying experiences included a perception of separation from the body, observing certain events without pain or distress, a meaningful evaluation of life, etc.

The lead author, Sam Parnia, elaborated: “As the brain is shutting down, many of its natural braking systems are released. Known as disinhibition, this provides access to the depths of a person’s consciousness, including stored memories, thoughts from early childhood to death, and other aspects of reality. While no one knows the evolutionary purpose of this phenomenon, it clearly reveals intriguing questions about human consciousness, even at death.

To Know More You May Refer To

NYU Langone Health / NYU Grossman School of Medicine. (2022, November 7). Lucid dying: Patients recall death experiences during CPR: Detection of rhythmic brain waves suggestive of near-death experiences. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 2, 2022 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/11/221107083318.htm

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