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Women Moving In Groups Have A Lower Risk Of Sexual Assault: Study

    news 21 July feature

    Psychology News

    Researchers at the University of Buffalo revealed how “capable guardianship” amongst friends can help prevent unwanted sexual experiences in women. The study is published in the journal Psychology of Women Quarterly.

    The Study

    The researchers surveyed 132 first-year college women who were asked to maintain a daily diary that detailed their social activities and their frequently employed strategies to avoid unwanted sexual experiences. Such experiences included nonconsensual sexual acts—ranging from unwanted touching to rape.

    The Findings

    The results revealed that “capable guardianship” amongst friends is an effective strategy for preventing sexual victimization in young women.

    In fact, monitoring friends’ alcohol consumption, moving in groups and checking on one another, as well as leaving social gatherings together are some of the widely used protective strategies.

    One of the lead authors, Jennifer Read, elaborated: “It is enormously important that women understand that by working together they can maximize their protection and safety in these contexts.”

    To Know More You May Refer To

    Blayney, J. A., Jenzer, T., Jaffe, A. E., Carroll, Q., & Read, J. P. (2022). Friends-Based Protective Strategies and Unwanted Sexual Experiences: A Daily Diary Examination of First Year College Women. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 46(2), 162–175. https://doi.org/10.1177/03616843221085219